When an injury is not an injury


Your training has been going well over the last few months and you feel like you’re ready to smash a PB at your next planned race. That is until you head out for your weekly track session. But instead of coming away feeling strong and on top of the world, you limp off the track with your ego pegged down to size and your immediate thoughts are, “Bugger! I’m injured again!” Your hopes and dreams of that PB lie shattered on the track as you miserably make your way back home.

For years runners have simply accepted that injuries are part of running and that you simply have to learn how to manage them. In my view that is complete rubbish!

Of course there are going to be set backs along the way and there are going to aches and pain and niggles from time to time, but injuries are a different thing all together.

There are really only two ways we get injured.

The first is through our own pure stupidity. For example, you and a few of your running mates head to the local stadium to watch a high class athletics meet. What you see is inspirational. Everything from the 100m sprints through to the 5000m track races see’s athlete after athlete pushing beyond their boundaries, fighting against their opposition and defeating their own personal daemons. Something deep inside of you wants nothing more than to get out on that track and open up the throttles. Which at the end of the meet you and your mates decide to do. The fact that you haven’t been near, let alone on a track in the last 20 years doesn’t deter you. With one of your friends doing the honors, “On your marks. Get set. Go!!!” you take off down the home straight like you just stole a hubcap. You’re flying. Past the 20m mark, 30m’s, 40m’s and then suddenly and without warning, you crash to the floor like a wounded buffalo. You’ve torn your hamstring and for the next 6 weeks and possible longer you will spend 1 hour a week getting this injury attended to.

The second way in which we get injured is through a lack of maintenance.

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